AHXPI

Background

The Advanced Heat Exchanger Process Intensification Consortia (AHXPI) was established in 1993 with four founding members. It has since grown to more than 15 members, including industry, research institutions, and government agencies. Our industrial members represent companies in the thermal management, environmental control, aerospace, energy/energy conversion, process, petrochemical, and refrigeration industries. Our involvement with both passive and active heat/mass transfer augmentation, thermo-mechanical optimization, and advanced manufacturing techniques for the past nearly twenty years has resulted in a team of faculty members, graduate students, and research engineers and scientists with diverse expertise in both experimental and analytical/computation research in the fields of interest of our sponsors. The consortia research activities have established the technical know-how and the knowledge base critical to successful implementation of emerging technologies in practical applications. The AHXPI group in recent years has introduced innovative design/optimization, manufacturing, and implementation of thermal management systems in both single-phase and phase-change regimes with heat transfer coefficients an order of magnitude higher than state of the art, and pressure drops below that of the state of the art systems. In the mass transfer area our projects have included work on separation and purification of gas and liquid flows, polymerization, and various reaction engineering based applications. Our mass transfer coefficients are nearly four orders of magnitude higher than state of the art. Our approach has focused on use of micro fluidics and micro-structured surfaces that can realize precise flow delivery and enhanced transport phenomena.

 

Group Picture of some current and former members of the AHXPI Consortium

Mission

The objective of the Advanced Heat Exchanger Process Intensification Consortia is to identify at early stages promising emerging technologies in heat and mass transfer enhancement with applications to development of miniaturized and smart heat exchangers and thermal management systems. Through combined analytical and experimental studies we will address the feasibility, manufacturing, and operational issues, and to evaluate the potential for near term implementation in the next generation of advanced, high performance energy conversion systems.

Goals

  • To Identify Promising emerging technologies that can be applied to the development of miniaturized and smart heat exchangers and thermal management systems

To Address

  • The manufacturing, cost, and reliability of new technologies
  • The potential for near term implementation commercialization in the next generation of Thermal management systems